dailydot:

Here at the Daily Dot we have a game we like to play, and that game is called “How many times can hellotailor mention Tilda Swinton in her articles?”

(Answer: Plenty)

(Source: travalicious, via kenyatta)

micdotcom:

The New Yorker’s Ferguson cover is one for the history books.

micdotcom:

The New Yorker’s Ferguson cover is one for the history books.

(via nprcodeswitch)

theroguefeminist:

elliedoh:

So when Miley Cyrus or Katy Perry bring black girls on stage, dance with them, acknowledge their figures- it’s offensive and appropriating. But, when Nicki Minaj makes an entire video focusing around black girl’s asses and asserts her power, reduces these women to objects and flaunts her authority it’s YAAASSSSS NICKI SERVE IT. Is that because she’s black? So it’s okay for people of the same race to dance with each other but someone who does not share the same levels of melanin enters the picture, they’re doing something wrong? …idgi 

You’re completely ignoring context. In Lily Allen’s Hard out Here video, she literally says, “I don’t shake my ass cause I have a brain” as Black women shake their asses in her video. She is literally degrading the Black women who shake their asses in the media. The song also uses references to Black rappers (i.e. the title of the song referencing the rap song “Hard out Here for a Pimp” and her lyric “bragging ‘bout my cars or talking ‘bout my chains”), suggesting that Black rappers are more sexist than white male musicians (which isn’t true, there’s lots of sexism in all music genres) and also suggest the source of sexism in the music industry is Black people (Black male rappers and twerking Black female dancers).
In contrast, Nicki Minaj is reclaiming a song (Baby Got Back) that was made by a Black male rapper who celebrated (but also objectified) Black female bodies. Throughout her song, Nicki raps like a man would, talking about her sexual conquests with men and the size of their dicks, almost as a way of doing to men what they have done to women (objectifying their dicks as Sir Mix A Lot objectified Black women’s asses and many other men objectify women’s vaginas). She also brags about her sexual prowess and stays in control and aggressive in the video (she goes as far as cutting a banana representing a dick and slapping Drake’s hand away—the video critiques the male gaze). The target of mockery and disparagement in Nicki’s video is men and the male gaze, and the video works to reclaim agency from it.
In what way is Nicki asserting power over her dancers? In her video, she twerks along side her back up dancers and dances with them and interacts with them on the same level. She is just as scantily clad as they are. Lily Allen, however, stays fully covered in her video, does not dance provocatively, and thus contrasts her own pure and respectable femininity with the Black women, using their twerking and scantily clad bodies as an example of “bad” female sexuality and femininity—of women “objectifying themselves.” This is racist because it frames Black female sexuality as lesser than white femininity and antithetical to feminism.
In summary: Nicki’s video is very much a celebration of female Black beauty and sexuality coming from a Black woman. Conversely, Lilly Allen’s is using Black women as props to frame them as a vile or bad form of sexuality or being too sexual to prop up her own feminism.
So you might say, “what about Miley Cyrus? she twerks along side her Black background dancers too!” But here’s the problem: Miley Cyrus continually appropriates Black culture and also uses Black women as props. It does matter that these artists are white because in these cases the point of including the Black women is either to, in Lily Allen’s case, offset Black sexuality/femininity as too sexual or bad in comparison with her white femininity/feminism, or, in the case of Miley Cyrus, to get “street cred” and exotify her own sexuality by appropriating Black culture and using Black people as props to do so. See this analysis of Lily Allen’s Hard Out Here video and this analysis of Miley Cyrus by Black people who know a lot more about this than I do.
I haven’t seen anything about Katy Perry using Black dancers. I’ve just seen criticisms of her appropriating AAVE and other PoC cultures. So I’m not sure why you brought her up, but maybe I just haven’t seen the videos in question.
Either way, it’s not like white artists having a diverse cast of back up dancers is a bad thing automatically. Here is an example of a white artist using back up dancers of other races without objectifying them: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Ilh1ewceco (notice this artist tackles the same issue as Lily Allen—sexism/objectification in the media—without being misogynist and racist toward other women). But the examples of Lily Allen and Miley Cyrus ARE racist and Nicki Minaj’s video isn’t the same as theirs.

theroguefeminist:

elliedoh:

So when Miley Cyrus or Katy Perry bring black girls on stage, dance with them, acknowledge their figures- it’s offensive and appropriating. But, when Nicki Minaj makes an entire video focusing around black girl’s asses and asserts her power, reduces these women to objects and flaunts her authority it’s YAAASSSSS NICKI SERVE IT. Is that because she’s black? So it’s okay for people of the same race to dance with each other but someone who does not share the same levels of melanin enters the picture, they’re doing something wrong? …idgi 

You’re completely ignoring context. In Lily Allen’s Hard out Here video, she literally says, “I don’t shake my ass cause I have a brain” as Black women shake their asses in her video. She is literally degrading the Black women who shake their asses in the media. The song also uses references to Black rappers (i.e. the title of the song referencing the rap song “Hard out Here for a Pimp” and her lyric “bragging ‘bout my cars or talking ‘bout my chains”), suggesting that Black rappers are more sexist than white male musicians (which isn’t true, there’s lots of sexism in all music genres) and also suggest the source of sexism in the music industry is Black people (Black male rappers and twerking Black female dancers).

In contrast, Nicki Minaj is reclaiming a song (Baby Got Back) that was made by a Black male rapper who celebrated (but also objectified) Black female bodies. Throughout her song, Nicki raps like a man would, talking about her sexual conquests with men and the size of their dicks, almost as a way of doing to men what they have done to women (objectifying their dicks as Sir Mix A Lot objectified Black women’s asses and many other men objectify women’s vaginas). She also brags about her sexual prowess and stays in control and aggressive in the video (she goes as far as cutting a banana representing a dick and slapping Drake’s hand away—the video critiques the male gaze). The target of mockery and disparagement in Nicki’s video is men and the male gaze, and the video works to reclaim agency from it.

In what way is Nicki asserting power over her dancers? In her video, she twerks along side her back up dancers and dances with them and interacts with them on the same level. She is just as scantily clad as they are. Lily Allen, however, stays fully covered in her video, does not dance provocatively, and thus contrasts her own pure and respectable femininity with the Black women, using their twerking and scantily clad bodies as an example of “bad” female sexuality and femininity—of women “objectifying themselves.” This is racist because it frames Black female sexuality as lesser than white femininity and antithetical to feminism.

In summary: Nicki’s video is very much a celebration of female Black beauty and sexuality coming from a Black woman. Conversely, Lilly Allen’s is using Black women as props to frame them as a vile or bad form of sexuality or being too sexual to prop up her own feminism.

So you might say, “what about Miley Cyrus? she twerks along side her Black background dancers too!” But here’s the problem: Miley Cyrus continually appropriates Black culture and also uses Black women as props. It does matter that these artists are white because in these cases the point of including the Black women is either to, in Lily Allen’s case, offset Black sexuality/femininity as too sexual or bad in comparison with her white femininity/feminism, or, in the case of Miley Cyrus, to get “street cred” and exotify her own sexuality by appropriating Black culture and using Black people as props to do so. See this analysis of Lily Allen’s Hard Out Here video and this analysis of Miley Cyrus by Black people who know a lot more about this than I do.

I haven’t seen anything about Katy Perry using Black dancers. I’ve just seen criticisms of her appropriating AAVE and other PoC cultures. So I’m not sure why you brought her up, but maybe I just haven’t seen the videos in question.

Either way, it’s not like white artists having a diverse cast of back up dancers is a bad thing automatically. Here is an example of a white artist using back up dancers of other races without objectifying them: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Ilh1ewceco (notice this artist tackles the same issue as Lily Allen—sexism/objectification in the media—without being misogynist and racist toward other women). But the examples of Lily Allen and Miley Cyrus ARE racist and Nicki Minaj’s video isn’t the same as theirs.

(via nibantaichou)

danoftomorrow:

Such majesty.

It’s our puppy, eightheadedboy ! 🐶

(Source: hounddogsrunning, via magnificentshibe)

soprie:

Stop calling what’s happening in Ferguson a “riot”.

It is not a riot.

Vancouver losing the Stanley Cup a few years ago was a riot. It was angry, drunken destruction with no purpose. (And as a Canadian, it was a shameful event)

Ferguson is not a riot. It is a protest. It is an uprising. It is a civil rights revolution. The prople of Ferguson may be angry, but they have a reason to be angry, and they are not violent, and they are not hooligans, thugs or looters. They are protesting for their human rights which are currently being denied.

Look at the difference between a riot and a protest. A riot is chaos. A protest has a purpose.

1 2

(via magnificentshibe)

fuckyeah-animalcrossing:

If Animal Crossing were made back in the mid-late 80’s, this is just one of the songs you would hear.

Awesome!

smartgirlsattheparty:

thedailyshow:

Extended Interview: Malala Yousafzai http://on.cc.com/XD2HLh #BackToSchool

We LOVE this Smart Girl!

smartgirlsattheparty:

thedailyshow:

Extended Interview: Malala Yousafzai http://on.cc.com/XD2HLh #BackToSchool

We LOVE this Smart Girl!

Thanks for the birthday greetings, everyone! 😊❤️🎂 And special thanks to @twoheadedboy for everything, including this Publix doughnut cake! I love you, honey!

Thanks for the birthday greetings, everyone! 😊❤️🎂 And special thanks to @twoheadedboy for everything, including this Publix doughnut cake! I love you, honey!

Darren Wilson, the officer who murdered Mike Brown, has raised over $11,000 from supporters in less than a day.

lilacghost:

This is unacceptable.

If you can, consider donating to help ensure that the children of Ferguson are kept fed or by donating to Mike Brown’s family for legal fees/funeral costs/etc.

Seriously?

(via nibantaichou)

"Vintage Rose" nail art. Do they look like flowers? 😅🌹

"Vintage Rose" nail art. Do they look like flowers? 😅🌹

wild-guy:

Kelly Rowland texting Nelly via Microsoft Excel and then getting annoyed when he doesn’t text back.

Lolol

(via plug)

jevoussaluespinelli:

iwriteaboutfeminism:

12:01 AM in Ferguson. Curfew broken.

Surprise! Bring in the ‘friendly police’ so all the outraged white people can cool down, and then turn around and do it all over again.

(via nibantaichou)

I love the Sheng’s! 💕 Thanks for coming to visit me and @twoheadedboy . Miss you both!!!

I love the Sheng’s! 💕 Thanks for coming to visit me and @twoheadedboy . Miss you both!!!

Anonymous said: I'm honestly pretty disappointed in you for using the TIPS FEDORA shit. These days it's really just an excuse to bully socially awkward guys with bad fashion sense.

maxscoville:

I’m honestly pretty disappointed that I spent all that time writing out my thoughts on how people should respect one another’s religious beliefs and you’re upset because I made fun of a fucking hat. There’s a pretty wide gap between something you buy at Target for fourteen bucks and put on your head at a jaunty angle and something around which you frame your entire outlook on life/afterlife.

The internet, when used properly, is a virtually limitless source of information and a window into countless different perspectives. It’s a way of tracking the constantly shifting nature of popular culture and media. If you’re a socially awkward guy with bad fashion sense, there’s a whole whopping fuckpile of places to help you sort your shit out.

Unless you’re Justin Timberlake or a hot girl who works at a bong store in Venice Beach, people are probably gonna give you some shit for wearing a fedora, just like they’ll probably give you some shit for wearing JNCOs, bigass 70s turtlenecks, or Crocs. If you wanna wear that sort of thing, own it. Wear your stupid fucking clothes with pride. 

If you walk into a room full of people who play a lot of video games and say “Aliens: Colonial Marines was awesome!” you’ll probably get mocked and ridiculed, because people who play video games tend to agree that that game, technically speaking, literally sucked the farts out of a dead dog’s ass. If you like it, that’s fine. Nobody’s going to actively prevent you from liking what you like, but you are not your favorite video game and you are not your goddamn stupid hat. You are a human being with hopes and dreams and feelings and emotions that, hopefully, extend beyond what’s on your head or in your Xbox.

However, like it or not, fashion is a thing that exists and will affect how people will perceive you. It’s a form of communication and what you’re wearing will often be the first impression you make on people. Is that bullshit? Absolutely. Will railing against it somehow make you immune to it? No.

I browse r/MaleFashion and  r/MaleFashionAdvice on a semi-regular basis, and while there are a flock of boners on there from time to time, it’s also a handy source of inspiration/insight. And since clothing is often expensive, there’s also r/FrugalMaleFashion.

I’ve worn my fair share of stupid-ass clothing. This isn’t some recent development since I turned into a seven-foot tall handsome man who can get away with Hawaiian shirts and Members Only jackets because hey-look-at-me-I-have-a-girlfriend. I used to be a fat kid who wore raver pants and hoodies I drew all over with Sharpie and Adidas Superstars I spraypainted neon yellow and a homemade pendant made out of the head of a Boba Fett action figure. If I could go back in time and make fun of myself, I would. But before I did that, I’d explain that being made fun of for wearing a stupid shirt or hat or whatever doesn’t mean everyone hates me.

At the end of the day, if you wanna wear a fedora, wear a fedora. If the worst part of being a white dude with a beard and a stupid hat is that people on the internet make fun of you, count yourself lucky. You could be getting shot for being a black dude with Skittles and a hoodie.

Seriously. It’s a hat. Go slam your fingers in the kitchen cabinets you goddamn babies.

lizclimo:

shark attack 

lizclimo:

shark attack